International Low Impact Development Symposium 2013

The 2013 International Low Impact Development (LID) Symposium is being hosted in the Midwestern United States through a collaborative effort between many states, universities, and organizations. The event will bring together over 1,000 professionals to share their research, implementation, policy, financing, and education strategies to build and restore cities while protecting our environment.

Urban_Hydrologics_LID_Symposium

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Urban Floods Prove Challenging to China

Recently, the “Beijing Review” published an article titled “When Rain Is a Pain“, where Yin Pumin reports that although China has had to work with floods throughout its long history, it has been only recently that urban flooding has become a serious problem. “Last year, two thirds of the 374.5 billion yuan ($54.83 billion) in damages caused by floods in China was incurred by cities, according to figures from the Ministry of Water Resources.” As the country continues to urbanize and cities become more and more congested, should there be a growing need to rethink the role of storm-water management and water harvesting practices at the urban planning and policy level in China?

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Bridging Climate Science & Water Management

The hydrological system is expected to experience some of the most considerable impacts of climate change, so the water resource management sector is facing a challenging future. By learning to interpret and work with climate projections, rather than historical data, water resource managers (WRMs) can be better prepared to meet these challenges. There is thus a need to address the gap between WRMs and climate scientists, so that the development of planning tools, management strategy, and general capacity takes potential changes brought by future climatic change into account.

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Singapore Highly Ranked in Water Management

In a recent article featured in the news section of eco-business, Lin Zhaowei from the Straits Times highlights a study conducted by the consultancy firm — Solidiance — that looked at the economic, environmental and social factors that determine how eco-friendly Asian-Pacific cities have become.  Because of their economic growth and rapid population increase, many of these Asian-Pacific cities have turned to green infrastructure projects to ensure environmental sustainability and among them Singapore is ranked no. 1  in water management and green building policy. According to Lin Zhaowei: “Singapore is among the top four in a new study ranking Asia-Pacific cities in terms of their ‘greenness’. This is the first comprehensive study of this kind in the region.”

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