Cities heat up urban streams

Streams draining urban heat islands tend to be hotter than rural and forested streams at baseflow because of warmer urban air and ground temperatures, paved surfaces, and decreased riparian canopy. Thermal regimes affect habitat quality and biogeochemical processes, and changes can be lethal if temperatures exceed upper tolerance limits of aquatic fauna.

Urban_Hydrologics_urban_streams

Urban infrastructure efficiently routes runoff over hot impervious surfaces and through storm drains directly into streams and can lead to rapid, dramatic increases in temperature. Stream temperature is an essential, but overlooked, aspect of the urban stream syndrome and is affected by reach-scale habitat variables, catchment-scale urbanization, and stream thermal regimes. That finding could be valuable for stream management and restoration efforts. For example, projects like planting streamside vegetation might help cool water under normal flow conditions.

Excerpt Text Credits: Freshwater Science, Published by: The Society for Freshwater Science, Abstract Located HERE

Via article in fondriest.com by Jeff Gillies — Article located HERE

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